Monthly Archives: June 2015

Reasons Why You Need To Attend a College in Canada

Canada is one of the best countries to go to when you want to attend college and here are the reasons why:

1. Reasonable price

The costs at Canadian universities will often be lower than at private colleges in the United States, as well as public universities in the U.S. for out-of state residents. Americans will pay roughly $25,000 to $30,000 a year. That price includes books, incidentals and coverage in Canadian health insurance.

“For your bang for your buck, Canadian schools are an amazingly good quality,” Whitney Laughlin, a college consultant in Santa Fe, NM, and British Columbia. Read More

2. Free Healthcare

So you’ve had 5 too many, and you end up passed out in a snow bank. Not to worry, you can get your stomach pumped for free! Ok, maybe they’d charge you for that but check-ups, STD testing, emergency hospital visits etc are all covered by universal healthcare. Student life is stressful enough without having to worry whether or not your insurance will cover that unexpected trip to the campus clinic. Read More

 

3. Great quality.

Canadian post-secondary education is uniformly strong and much more standardized than in the U.S.. Canadian universities offer a world-class education in some gorgeous cities, but they are under the radar.

Why?

“Canadian schools are under the radar because the whole country is under the radar,” Laughlin says. She notes that you can get a “super high quality education” at many Canadian universities. Read More

4. Exciting Campus Lifestyle

Canada’s post-secondary campuses aren’t only wired with the latest in sophisticated technology, but countless other modern amenities as well. From Olympic-quality sports facilities to public concert halls and art galleries, Canada’s post-secondary campuses offer you enormous possibilities for learning and leisure. Plus, you’ll have incredible opportunities to meet like-minded individuals and gain valuable experience through student-run governments, radio, newspapers and businesses.

Contact:
Canadian University Real Estate
3215 Macdonald St Vancouver, BC V6L 2N2‎
(778) 991-0649

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Summer in Calgary

The sun is out and the long-awaited summer season is officially here. There may be no better place to enjoy the summer season than the city of Calgary. Not only is the weather spectacular during the summer months, it also boasts the world famous Calgary stampede among many other venues during the summer. Here are a few of the highlights coming to the city this summer. Continue reading

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How to Know a Good Home Deal

1. Look for “price-reduced” signs.

If the price drops once, it’s likely to drop again. Keep an eye out for a pattern of dropping prices. Once there is blood in the water, sharks can keep feeding. That being said, you can’t ask a seller who has just lowered his or her price by $20,000 yesterday to drop it again today. But if they drop the price once, they’re predisposed to drop it again. Read More

2. Know the market

The best way to snag a great deal on a house is to come armed with a boatload of data showing that you’ve done your homework and know what the place is worth. Thankfully, information on everything—from what comparable houses have sold for to what exactly has been remodeled, and when—is pretty much at your fingertips, through commercial sites like zillow.com and trulia.com as well as via government databases, such as your local county assessor’s, planning department’s, and clerk and recorder’s websites. Such data are especially useful when making an offer on a foreclosed home that’s been repossessed by a bank, where you won’t have to deal with touchy issues like a seller’s sentimental attachments to his home. “All banks want is to get a fair price and get out,” says Pat Lashinsky, chief executive of real estate brokerage ZipRealty, which lists many bank-owned foreclosures on its website. “Don’t try to low-ball the bank. But if you come in with all the statistics and can make your case that yours is a fair price, they’re more likely to take it.”

3. Be an attractive buyer

Get preapproved for a mortgage before shopping, Young said. Sellers will take you more seriously, an important point when they’re getting multiple offers.

For sellers, the best offer isn’t always synonymous with the highest bid. In general, the fewer contingencies you have on the contract, the better, Haley said. “When we’re looking at five or 10 different offers, having the highest price is great, but we’re also looking for the highest certainty of closing,” she said.

A contingency that you need to have a contract on your current home before completing the transaction, for example, could put you at a disadvantage when you’re competing with a buyer who doesn’t make that stipulation. But tread lightly when giving up conditions: A home inspection contingency, for example, could save you from buying a home fraught with problems found during an inspector’s exam. Read more

Contact:
Canadian University Real Estate
3215 Macdonald St Vancouver, BC V6L 2N2‎
(778) 991-0649

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How to Choose the Best Real Estate Agent

If you plan on buying a house and needed the help of a real estate agent then here are some tips on how to choose the best one:

 

1. Select an agent with the right credentials

Just as doctors specialize, so do real estate agents. And even generalists will get additional training in some areas. So that alphabet soup after the name can be an indication that the person has taken additional classes in a certain specialty of real estate sales. Here’s what some of the designations mean:

  • CRS (Certified Residential Specialist): Completed additional training in handling residential real estate.
  • ABR (Accredited Buyer’s Representative): Completed additional education in representing buyers in a transaction.
  • SRES (Seniors Real Estate Specialist): Completed training aimed at helping buyers and sellers in the 50-plus age range.

If the agent calls himself a Realtor with a capital “R,” that means he’s a member of NAR.

Source: Bankrate

2. Friends & Family

Maybe you have a friend or relative who happens to be a real estate agent. But just because you know the person well, doesn’t mean she would be the best agent for you. Does she know the neighborhoods where you want to buy? Is she a tough negotiator? Will you be comfortable expressing your dissatisfaction, or even firing her if she can’t get the job done? Hold a friend or relative to the same high standards you’d expect from any agent.

Source: Redfin

3. Interview several agents

Whether you are looking for a buyer agent or seller agent. Remember though, agents will tell you what you want to hear. Make sure they are not selling you a dream partnership… you want to hire a realistic real estate agent. Don’t sign a buyers agreement form before looking for property (you should feel free to build trust with a real estate agent over several hours of looking before signing anything).

Source: WikiHow

Contact:
Canadian University Real Estate
3215 Macdonald St Vancouver, BC V6L 2N2‎
(778) 991-0649

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Why Calgary is Good for Your Future

Completing college and obtaining your higher education degree is the first step towards having a great career. Most college students know what type of job they would like to pursue after graduation, but many do not know that the area in which you live could have a major impact on achieving your professional goals. Not only does Calgary provide excellent opportunities for education, but you will also have a wider path at a better future in this area. Continue reading

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How to Buy a Property in Canada

If you need some help with regards to buying real estate in Canada then here’s what you should do:

1. Look for the popular locations

Down the years, intrepid Britons have immigrated to every part of Canada. For those contemplating the purchase of a holiday home, however, travel time and cost will probably govern the choice of location. These will vary considerably depending on whereabouts in the UK you live. Owing to the comparative ease of travel, British second home purchasers have traditionally favoured eastern Canada. However, the recent introduction of low-cost transatlantic services has led to increased interest in western areas. Purpose-built resorts are also proving popular. We hope this guide provides a place to start. There are many resources to help with further research, including television and radio programmes, magazines, the Internet and property exhibitions, as well as estate agents in both the UK and Canada.

Source: WikiHow

2. Newspapers and real estate magazines

Check the new homes section in daily newspapers. Look for the free real estate magazines available at newsstands, convenience stores and other outlets. These publications are free and give pictures and short descriptions of homes for sale.

Source: CMHC-SCHL

3. Mortgage

As a Canadian resident, financing is typically available at 75% of the purchase price for a primary residence over a 25-year term. For a non-resident, the ratio is generally 65% mortgage and 35% as a down payment. Qualifying for the mortgage financing is probably the same as in other countries – interviews via phone, fax, e-mail to gather personal information which includes assets/liabilities, employment and/or income information. Each borrower’s application will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Your realtor will be able to advise you on suitable mortgage brokers.

The mortgage approval may take approximately 24-48 hours after application and documentation has been submitted to the lender. The documentation generally required is income verification, tax returns, credit bureau or bank’s report (letter from borrower’s own bank stating that all accounts are in good standing to date), down payment confirmation via bank statements, copy of 2 pieces of ID and real estate appraisal. Foreign banks cannot register mortgages in Canada, so any mortgage would have to be raised via a Canadian mortgage broker.

Source: Assignments Canada

Contact:
Canadian University Real Estate
3215 Macdonald St Vancouver, BC V6L 2N2‎
(778) 991-0649

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Investing near a University

Is there a housing shortage at your local university? In the city of Calgary, there are always more students than rooms available. With ever increasing enrollment at all Canadian Universities, now may be the best time to invest in real estate near your local place of higher education. Investing in real estate near the Calgary University can offer all kinds of rewards and can be a lucrative investment. Here are some reasons as to why investing in student housing is always a good idea. Continue reading

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Restaurants in Calgary

There is one thing college students worry about more than finals, work or finding University of Calgary real estate for sale: having plenty of great food options in the area. Luckily, Calgary is full of excellent restaurants that meet the steep demands and hearty appetites of higher learners. Here are some of the best places to eat in Calgary. Continue reading

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